Organization Strategy

Executing a Winning Organization Strategy

Companies seeking to gain market share have to execute an organization strategy that allows them to differentiate and win in the marketplace. There are many ways for organizations to differentiate. These may include, but are not limited to: Great customer service Most innovate product offerings Most convenient delivery method Best

Complexities

Using Organizational Alignment to Absorb Complexities

Competition has changed the corporate landscape and the way we must do business. Differentiation in the marketplace used to be much simpler: focus on making a great product or providing an improved or much-needed service. Those days are gone. Today, products themselves have become undeniably similar and struggle to deliver

Change Transformation

Avoiding Common Obstacles to Change Transformation

There is not always a clear path to an organization design and implementation of a strategic plan. While leadership might decide that a change is in the best interest of the company, there are many obstacles that could stand in the way of a real change transformation. Our work with

Organization Change

How to Effectively Implement Organization Change

I am often asked how to implement organization change. Effective implementation starts with the leadership team. The role of leadership in change management is to: Facilitate Change: Bringing the right people together, understanding the parts of the organization that will be affected, and knowing how to orchestrate the complexity of

Organization Design

Three Signs That You Need a New Organization Design

In today’s highly competitive global market, companies rise and fall faster than ever before. Motorola, Eastman Kodak, and Blockbuster are examples of well-recognized brands that were once market leaders in their respective industries. These companies were known for being innovative and capitalizing on market opportunities. All of that changed when they

Strategic Business Planning

Assembling the Right People for Strategic Business Planning

Having the right people on your strategic business planning team is essential for achieving desired results. Leaders should include people who are aligned with the organization’s goals. It is also advisable to have people on your strategic business planning team who understand and agree with the logic used in making

Give Human Resource Business Partners a Break

As we work with major organizations undergoing HR transformation (and many are still underway), we find variants of the three-pronged HR delivery model (business partners, HR operations and centers of expertise) popularized by David Ulrich over 20 years ago. One recurring challenge is freeing up Business Partners to fulfill the strategic relationship building and brokering role envisioned in many, if not most HR models.

Organizational Megalomania

Everyone has limited resources. Everyone must choose where value will and will not be offered. Understanding and appreciating this enables organizations to focus limited resources on the most strategic and differentiating activities. It enables leaders to be smart about where they prune costs. Believing that your organization can do everything—that it can be everything for everyone—prevents an organization from really differentiating itself in a sustainable way.

Rethinking the Rules of Organization Design in Emerging Markets

The typical organizational design process is like drawing a blueprint, building a house, and moving in. This is the familiar strategy-structure-staffing sequence that has come to dominate the practice. Ongoing organization effectiveness work in emerging markets is revealing that this tried and true pattern for effective organization design still applies, but there are some unique considerations that need to be grappled during the push forward into a new frontier. We will highlight four key issues—speed, entry and evolution, leadership development, and unique design needs—that can change the rules when doing organization design in high-potential markets.

You Really CAN Move the Needle with Metrics

We’ve all heard many times the idea that “people will do what they’re measured on.” Is it really true? If I told you that the defect rate for this company’s premier product dropped from 12% to 1% in only three weeks and then further declined to 0.5% in just three more weeks, you’d probably think I was making it up. Well, that is exactly the result that occurred—and it occurred solely from beginning to measure quality in parallel with measuring productivity (in this case, speed). Perhaps what is even more revealing is that there was no incentive linked to quality improvement. All the while, workers were being paid a bonus for speed—which, incidentally, did not suffer when quality improved. That they were not being equally rewarded for quality made no difference. The metrics alone changed their behavior.